Week of April 11, 2021

Saturday April 10th
4:00 pm † Intentions of the Parishioners

Divine Mercy Sunday April 11th
9:00 am For those affected by COVID-19
11:00 am † Intentions of the Presider

Monday April 12th
6:30 am † Sisters of St. David Convent

Tuesday April 13th
St. Martin I
6:30 am † William Eagan

Wednesday April 14th
6:30 am † Bernice Coleman

Thursday April 15th
6:30 am † Lorraine M. Hendricks

Friday April 16th
6:30 am † Joseph & Marietta Johnson

Saturday April 17th
8:00 am Intentions of Ava Curnell and Family


Remembering in our Prayers…
… all those who are sick … Mary Trauger, Loretta Boyle, Margaret DeLucas, James Dehan, Nina Ferraro, Teresa Riegal, Eric Bull, Bruce Seth, Vanessa Wismer, Adeline Buccini, Adriana Sproehnle, Karen Dale and the residents of Garden Springs and the Landings.

… all those who are deceased … Alice Schaeffer, Paul E. Gombeda III, Marilyn Karzewski, Kim Chabin & Richard Noel.

Eternal rest grant unto them, O Lord.

Spiritual Reflection 4/11/2021

Divine Mercy: The Easter Gift

On this Feast of Divine Mercy, we celebrate Jesus’ tender mercy and love which is lavishly poured upon those who surrender their lives to Him in profound trust and accept His Easter Gift. What is this very special Easter Gift and how can we receive it? The Easter Gift is the forgiveness of our sins and the total remission of all temporal punishment for them. Everyone who trusts in God’s merciful love can attain this Divine Gift by cleansing their souls through the Sacrament of Penance in close proximity to this Feast and fervently receiving the Most Holy Eucharist on Divine Mercy Sunday. Saint John Paul II, after many years of prayer and reflection on the revelations of Our Lord to Saint Faustina, canonized her and declared the message of Divine Mercy God’s will for us. It was in the Jubilee Year of 2000 that the yearly universal celebration was established as a Feast on the Second Sunday of Easter. The Gospel which is proclaimed on Divine Mercy Sunday and the Image of Divine Mercy, help us to grasp the full sense and value of this gift.

The Evangelist John makes us share in the emotion felt by the Apostles in their meeting with Christ after His Resurrection. Our attention focuses on the gesture of Jesus, who transmits to the fearful, astounded disciples the mission of being ministers of Divine Mercy. He shows them His hands and His side, which bear the marks of the Passion, and tells them, “As the Father has sent Me, even so I send you” (Jn 20:21). Immediately afterwards, “He breathed on them and said, Receive the Holy Spirit. If you forgive the sins of any they are forgiven; if you retain the sins of any, they are retained” (Jn 20:22-23). Jesus entrusted to the Apostles the gift of “forgiving sins,” a gift that flows from the wounds in His hands, His feet, and especially from His pierced side. From there a wave of Divine Mercy is poured out over all humanity.

On this Feast of Divine Mercy, the most beautiful message comes from Thomas, the disciple who arrived late; he was the only one missing. But the Lord waited for Thomas. Mercy does not abandon those who stay behind. Now, while we are looking forward to a recovery from the pandemic, there is a danger that we will forget those who are suffering and left behind. We must remember that we are all frail, all precious and all equal in God’s sight. God desires that we partake of His free Gift of Mercy and share His mercy and compassionate love with everyone.

Trust in Jesus is the essence of the message of mercy that Saint Faustina received. The image of Divine Mercy with the inscription “Jesus, I trust in You!” was revealed and explained to her by Jesus Himself. She saw coming from His Heart, that was overflowing with generous love, two rays of light which illuminated the world. Jesus told Faustina that the two rays of light denote blood and water. The blood recalls the sacrifice of Calvary and the mystery of the Holy Eucharist; the water, according to the rich symbolism of John, makes us think of Baptism and the Gift of the Holy Spirit (Jn 3:5; 4:14).

May our hearts overflow with gratitude to our Risen Lord for His Easter Gift of Divine Mercy and resolve to share this tremendous gift of Jesus’ compassionate love as a beacon of light and hope for all our brothers and sisters throughout the world. Let us ask Mary, our “Mother of Mercy”, in union with Saint Faustina and Saint John Paul II, to obtain for us an awareness of the depth of Divine Mercy. Fixing our gaze along with theirs on the face of the Risen Christ, let us make our own their prayer of trusting abandonment and pray with firm hope: “Jesus, I trust in You!”

God love and bless you!
Sr. Kathleen Fitzpatrick, IHM

Further information on Divine Mercy is available at: https://www.marian.org/divinemercy.

Spiritual Reflection 4/4/2021

+Dear St. David Parishioners,

We have just commemorated the most holy days of the Church year – the Sacred Triduum. What do these days teach us?

Holy Thursday – On the night before He died, Jesus gave us a living memorial, the gift of His Body and Blood in the Eucharist. On this most holy night, Jesus also instituted the priesthood. Jesus’ love is so great that He gifts us with Himself in Holy Communion every day. Let us pray that people will join as a community in the Mass each week and also pray for an increase of vocations to the priesthood.

Washing of feet: Jesus humbled Himself as He stooped to wash the feet of His apostles. In this act, Jesus encourages us to serve one another out of love, not out of obligation.

Betrayal of Judas and the denial of Peter: We are weak and sinful human beings and sometimes we really mess up. Judas did not believe in Jesus’ mercy and forgiveness – Peter did. We have an immeasurably loving and forgiving God. Judas took matters into his own hands, rather than repenting and trusting in God. He took his own life. Judas’ death was not the answer. Only God has the power and right to give and take away life. After His resurrection Jesus appeared to Peter and asked him, and He asks each one of us, “Do you love Me?” How we answer Jesus’ invitation of love and encounter can change our lives forever.

Good Friday:  The passion narratives help us to recognize the unconditional love that Jesus has for each one of us, despite our sins and shortcomings. Jesus freely suffered to save us individually and all of us collectively from the power of sin. We can contemplate the 14 Stations of the Cross, and let Jesus’ love penetrate our minds, hearts, and souls.  “We adore You, O Christ, and we bless You. Because by Your Holy Cross, You have redeemed the world.”

Holy Saturday teaches us holy patience, not an extremely popular virtue for those of us who often want an answer, or something done immediately. Many followers of Jesus thought that His death was the end, but His Mother Mary knew differently. She prayed with the apostles to calm their fears. They hid in the upper room for fear that they too may suffer crucifixion as their Divine Friend Jesus had endured. In the silence of Holy Saturday’s tomb, we wait, and pray, thinking – “What Wondrous Love!” https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VGoypOMLZ9Y

Easter Sunday: Alleluia! Jesus is alive! Rejoice for Jesus has risen from death to new life and offers us eternal life in Him. Jesus literally demonstrates to us that His love is more powerful than any sin. We know and believe deeply that, “God so loved the world that He gave His only Son, so that everyone who believes in Him might not perish but might have eternal life” (John 3:16). Therefore, let us move away any stones in our lives that keep us from living and loving Jesus as we know we should. We need not be afraid; Jesus’ grace is alive in us. He is the Light of the World! May we rise to living a more committed life with Jesus’ life, love, and peace in us! May the love, joy, and hope of the Resurrected Jesus abide with you and your family today and always!

In Mary’s Immaculate Heart, I am,

Sister Mary

Week of April 4, 2021

Holy Saturday April 3rd
8:00 pm Intentions of the Parishioners

Easter Sunday April 4th
9:00 am For those affected by COVID-19
11:00 am † Intentions of the Presider

Easter Monday April 5th
6:30 am † William Eagan

Tuesday April 6th
6:30 am † Robert Quinn

Wednesday April 7th
6:30 am † Katherine “Kathy” Lamb

Thursday April 8th
6:30 am † Josephine Gallo

Friday April 9th
6:30 am † Deceased members of Reilly and McMahon Family

Saturday April 10th
8:00 am Intentions of Mike & Pat Stelacio


Remembering in our Prayers…
… all those who are sick … Mary Trauger, Loretta Boyle, Margaret DeLucas, James Dehan, Nina Ferraro, Teresa Riegal, Eric Bull, Bruce Seth, Vanessa Wismer, Adeline Buccini, Adriana Sproehnle, Karen Dale and the residents of Garden Springs and the Landings.

… all those who are deceased …

Eternal rest grant unto them, O Lord.

Week of March 28, 2021

Saturday March 27th
4:00 pm † Intentions of the Parishioners

Palm Sunday March 28th
9:00 am † For those affected by COVID-19
11:00 am † Intentions of the Presider

Monday March 29th
6:30 am † Francis and Louise Lindgren

Tuesday March 30th
6:30 am† Richard M. Gusherowski

Wednesday March 31st
6:30 am † Elle Loughney

Holy Thursday April 1st
7:00 pm Intentions of the Presider

Good Friday April 2nd
3:00 pm Prayer Service

Holy Saturday April 3rd
8:00 pm Intentions of the Parishioners


Remembering in our Prayers…
… all those who are sick … Mary Trauger, Loretta Boyle, Margaret DeLucas, James Dehan, Nina Ferraro, Teresa Riegal, Eric Bull, Bruce Seth, Vanessa Wismer, Adeline Buccini, Adriana Sproehnle, Karen Dale and the residents of Garden Springs and the Landings.

… all those who are deceased … Sister Edwardine Coleman, IHM

Eternal rest grant unto them, O Lord.

Spiritual Reflection 3/28/2021

The Lord’s Passion

I have always had a hard time with using the word Passion for the trial and punishment that Jesus received before his death. Merriam-Webster dictionary defines “passion” in the following ways:
       1: a strong feeling or emotion,
       2: an object of someone’s love, liking, or desire,
       3: strong liking or desire: love.
These are all words of love and kindness. These words are not reflected in what Jesus went through on that day. Why would anyone love to be deceived, betrayed, denied, spit on, scourged, crowned with thorns, mocked unmercifully, and finally hung on a tree? How can these actions be desired by anyone let alone the only Son of the creator of the world? The one and true king.

We know that Jesus was in total fear and agony for the task that had been asked of Him to do by His Father, but He did it anyway. We know how alone He felt and how abandon He felt because we can hear His words. He even felt abandoned by His Father who asked Him to do these things. He chose to do it anyway. It was not something He wanted to do, it was what was asked by His Father to do and out of total obedience and love for the Father, He did it. This then raises another question; why would the Father ask His Son to do sacrifice Himself for our sins? Jesus answered the question and told us that He and the Father share the same thoughts. So, these events were also the Father’s Passion, but this event could not be what they truly wanted. There has to be something else; some other reason our Lord chose these trials for Himself. That other reason is us. No one would have chosen such things unless they were doing it for someone else, someone they had a Passion for. Our God has a total and complete love and longing for US.

We are the Lord’s true passion. Through these events, Christ became the perfect sacrifice taken away all sin so that we could be united with His Father in an eternal life. Through the Son we can now have a full relationship with the Father. In our full relationship with the Father and the Son we share in their passion. So, we now have a passion for each other. Love as I have loved.

Live Jesus in your hearts forever.
Deacon Chris

Spiritual Reflection 3/14/2021

The Miracle of Forgiveness

        The renowned English poet Alexander Pope stated: “To err is human; to forgive is divine.” Frequently and in unequivocal terms, Jesus has reaffirmed the indispensable obligation of all to forgive those who offend us, to pray for our enemies, and to do good to those who hurt us! This is the ideal we strive for, but how difficult it can be!  To attain this lofty spiritual goal, we must fervently pray for the gift of God’s grace, the virtue of humility, beg Our Lady of Sorrows to attain for us the grace to forgive, as she did, and most importantly, spend time meditating on the Lord Jesus’ Passion and Death.

        To forgive our enemies, to pray for them and to love them goes far beyond our fallen human nature. We desperately need God’s overflowing and abundant graces. Saint Augustine says that we are all beggars before God. Therefore, we should beg Him for the grace to forgive and trust that God will bestow His abundant grace upon us. It is also important to respond to God’s grace of mercy and forgiveness immediately, so that vindictive thoughts do not fester in our minds. Another efficacious spiritual weapon is that of humility. If forgiveness proves laborious and near impossible, then call to mind your worse sin and reflect on the fact that God forgave you as soon as you begged for His mercy and forgiveness in the Sacrament of Reconciliation. Pray to Mary, who except for Jesus Himself, suffered more than any human person, as she heard and witnessed her only Son suffer and die on the cross, after being brutally mistreated. In spite of this, Our Lady of Mercy, forgave from the depths of her Immaculate Heart. May she attain for us the grace to forgive and be merciful, as she was! The most convincing motivational force to compel us to forgive those who offend us, is the serene contemplation of Jesus hanging on the cross, shedding every drop of His most Precious Blood to save all humanity, but in particular my own immortal soul.

        As we continue our Lenten journey, let us ask the Holy Spirit to bring to light any trace of unforgiveness for past hurts, which may still linger in the depths of our minds and hearts. Then, through fervent prayer to our Savior for the gift of His grace and the intercession of our Mother Mary, offer wholehearted forgiveness to all! What relief! What comfort! What joy! What a miracle! It is a gift you give yourself!

God love and bless you always!
Sr. Kathleen Fitzpatrick, IHM

Spiritual Reflection 3/21/2021

What is it like to lose our life?
How hard is it to let go of our ego’s?

There was an article written in Catholic Review on January 19, 2012 that I found helpful as a different way of looking at losses in life that maybe helpful to you:

The ego vs. the spirit

I discovered a little meditation recently that I now include as part of my morning prayers. It goes as follows: “Good morning. This is God. I will be handling all of your problems today. I will not need your help. So have a miraculous day!”

Imagine how wonderful life would be if we could allow ourselves to believe that and to live that. It’s another way of saying, “Let go and let God.” Suppose we actually allowed God to run our lives rather than our ego running our lives. Most of us were raised to think we were to do good things for God. In reality, what we are called to do is to allow God to do good things through us. That’s a huge difference. Most of us have discovered that our best efforts don’t always pan out. We can torture ourselves with thoughts that “we’re just not good enough. We haven’t done enough.” That’s our ego stressing us. “I can do all things through Christ who strengthens me” is allowing God to work through us.

I’m often asked, “What exactly do you mean by ego?” Put most simply, our ego is our way of being in the world. Our ego is what I call the “little me,” the part of us with worries, fears, doubts, stress, and so on. Our ego feels separate and alone, and is always trying to prove itself. Our “true self” our true identity is with our spirit, with the image and likeness of God that we are created in. The world wants us to forget our true identity, which is why Christ came to save us from the world.

What are some signs that the ego, rather than God, is running our life? Here are a few examples:

First, I am easily offended. The ego loves to be at odds with others. “Did you hear what she said, or what he did?” The spirit, by contrast, is always peaceful and forgiving. The spirit is never offended by anyone’s attitude toward me. “Father forgive them, they don’t know what they’re doing” is the highest form of forgiveness. A practical axiom to follow is, “What someone else thinks of me is none of my business.”

Second, the ego has the need to win. Games of competition can be fun as long as we don’t identify too much with the outcome. The ego identifies with winning. The spirit identifies with the fun. Years ago, when the Baltimore Colts were moved to Indianapolis, people, including my ego, were saying, “It’s a tragedy!” The great Colt player, Artie Donovan got it right. He said at the time, “A kid with cancer, that’s a tragedy. A football team leaving town, that’s not a tragedy.” That was the spirit speaking.

Third, the ego loves to be “right” to be “superior.” We can have “institutional egos” as well. “My team is better than your team. My country is better than your country. My religion is better than your religion. My God is better than your God.” Killing in the name of God is an example of egos infiltrating even religions. The spirit always says, “Love your neighbor as yourself.”

A fourth sign of ego is always wanting more. It’s never enough. The ego needs more. By contrast, the spirit, rather than wanting more, is grateful for what it has. A state of gratitude is an infallible sign of the presence of the spirit.

A fifth sign of the presence of ego is that we find our identity in our achievements or reputation. The spirit, by contrast, finds its identity in its love for others.

Obviously, I could keep going on with this list. The challenge is just to be aware. We can choose to allow our ego to run our lives. We can choose to allow God to run our lives. As Father Fred Cwiekowski said to me many years ago in the seminary: “If Jesus is not Lord of your life, something else will be.”

Week of March 21, 2021

Saturday March 20th
4:00 pm † Intentions of the Parishioners

Sunday March 21st
5th Sunday of Lent
9:00 am † For those affected by COVID-19
11:00 am † Intentions of the Presider

Monday March 22nd
6:30 am † Marion Martin

Tuesday March 23rd
St. Turibius of Mogrovejo
6:30 am † Jesus Covarrubias

Wednesday March 24th
6:30 am † Ernest Clark

Thursday March 25th
Annunciation of the Lord
6:30 am † Mary Garofalo

Friday March 26th
6:30 am † Special Intention

Saturday March 27th
8:00 am Christopher Higgins


Remembering in our Prayers…
… all those who are sick … Mary Trauger, Loretta Boyle, Margaret DeLucas, James Dehan, Nina Ferraro, Teresa Riegal, Eric Bull, Bruce Seth, Vanessa Wismer and the residents of Garden Springs and the Landings.

… all those who are deceased …

Eternal rest grant unto them, O Lord.

Week of March 14, 2021

Saturday March 13th
4:00 pm † Intentions of the Parishioners

Sunday March 14th
4th Sunday of Lent
9:00 am † For those affected by COVID-19
11:00 am † Intentions of the Presider

Monday March 15th
6:30 am † Margaret Martin

Tuesday March 16th
6:30 am † Lorraine M. Hendricks

Wednesday March 17th
St. Patrick
6:30 am † Special Intention

Thursday March 18th
St. Cyril of Jerusalem
6:30 am Andrew Harbough

Friday March 19th
St. Joseph
6:30 am † Richard M. Gusherowski

Saturday March 20th
8:00 am Mr. and Mrs. Joseph Magee


Remembering in our Prayers…
… all those who are sick … Mary Trauger, Loretta Boyle, Margaret DeLucas, James Dehan, Nina Ferraro, Teresa Riegal, Eric Bull, Bruce Seth, Vanessa Wismer and the residents of Garden Springs and the Landings.

… all those who are deceased …

Eternal rest grant unto them, O Lord.

Week of March 7, 2021

Saturday March 6th
4:00 pm † Intentions of the Parishioners

Sunday March 7th
3rd Sunday of Lent
9:00 am † For those affected by COVID-19
11:00 am † Intentions of the Presider

Monday March 8th
St. John of God
6:30 am † Maureen ‘Bean’ Gibbons

Tuesday March 9th
St. Frances of Rome
6:30 am Eric Trump

Wednesday March 10th
6:30 am † John Kenney

Thursday March 11th
6:30 am † Robert Edmund Scully

Friday March 12th
6:30 am † Joan Garofalo

Saturday March 13th
8:00 am † Deceased members of the Link & Simpson Families


Remembering in our Prayers…
… all those who are sick … Mary Trauger, Loretta Boyle, Margaret DeLucas, James Dehan, Nina Ferraro, Teresa Riegal, Eric Bull, Bruce Seth, Vanessa Wismer and the residents of Garden Springs and the Landings.

… all those who are deceased … Mark McAllister & Louisa Cooper.

Eternal rest grant unto them, O Lord.

Spiritual Reflection 3/1/2021

+Dear Saint David Parishioners,

Isn’t it hard to believe that we are nearing the half-way mark of Lent? This is a good day to assess how we are doing during this season of renewal. We can check ourselves by examining how we are practicing the three hallmarks of this special time: prayer, fasting, and almsgiving, and ask:

Prayer
Have I carved out some extra time to let God speak with me by participating in the sacraments, reading scripture, or viewing religious content on the Internet or TV?

Fasting
Have I given up something, such as food or some other material thing, to demonstrate my dependence on God? Some authors suggest fasting from negativity and gossip in order to grow in charity.

Almsgiving
If I have fasted from treats during Lent or from some other type of entertainment, or from unnecessary shopping, then the money saved could be donated to those in need.

In our reading for this Third Sunday of Lent, Jesus got justifiably angry with the moneychangers, mainly because they were making money and material things their main priority in life rather than God. The challenge then at this point in Lent is to recognize the truly important priorities in life in order to achieve authentic JOY — putting Jesus first, Others second, and Yourself last. Any other arrangement will and does not provide lasting joy.

God reminded the people of Israel and us: “I, the Lord, am your God… you shall not have other gods besides me.” We give praise and thanks because “God so loved the world that He gave His only Son, so that everyone who believes in Him might have eternal life” (John 3:16). May zeal for God’s house consume us as we embark on the remaining weeks of renewal for our soul and lives!

In Mary’s Immaculate Heart, I am,
Sister Mary

Some Lenten resources can be found at:

https://www.loyolapress.com/catholic-resources/liturgical-year/lent/

https://onlineministries.creighton.edu/CollaborativeMinistry/Lent/

https://www.usccb.org/search?key=Lent

Week of February 28, 2021

Saturday February 27th
4:00 pm † Intentions of the Parishioners

Sunday February 28th
9:00 am † For those affected by COVID-19
11:00 am † Intentions of the Presider

Monday March 1st
6:30 am † Albert and Dolores Anderson

Tuesday March 2nd
6:30 am Mark Baumeister and Family

Wednesday March 3rd
6:30 am David Belasi

Thursday March 4th
6:30 am † Joseph & Mary Garofalo

Friday March 5th
6:30 am† Mary Di Gregorio

Saturday March 6th
8:00 am † Harry Weckerly, Sr. 4th Anniversary


Remembering in our Prayers…
… all those who are sick … Mary Trauger, Loretta Boyle, Margaret DeLucas, James Dehan, Robert Farrell, Nina Ferraro, Teresa Riegal, Eric Bull, Bruce Seth, Vanessa Wismer and the residents of Garden Springs and the Landings.

… all those who are deceased … Tom Rufe, Ed Myers, & Elizabeth Savidge.

Eternal rest grant unto them, O Lord.

Spiritual Reflection 2/28/2021

Transfiguration

Have you ever been to a place or event that you did not want to leave?  You are either having such a great time or you are moved emotionally with joy that you just do not want it to end.  I imagine that is what Peter was feeling on this mountain top.  He did not want the experience to end.  He had been lost and after following Jesus he begins to realize who Christ truly is.  Why would anyone want the opportunity of being in the glorified Lord’s presence to end?  This scene takes place after Peter hears Jesus tell him and the other Apostles, Jesus will have to suffer and die before He comes into His glory.  When Peter tells Jesus this should not happen, Jesus comes down hard on Peter telling him, “get behind me Satan!”  This is difficult for the Apostles to understand, so Jesus decides to plant the seed of hope in them.  He takes Peter, the future leader of the Church; James, the first Apostle to die for following Christ and John, the Apostle who will reveal the Final Revelation of the Lord, up to a mountain and gives them this gift of the vision of His Transfiguration.  Our Lord wanted to show them that the pain and suffering He will go through will not be for nothing.  It has a great reward.  This vision of Christ will also help them in spreading the word of who Jesus is.

As Jesus is transfigured, the Apostles see Him in conversation with Moses and Elijah.  Peter is so moved he makes the suggestion that they build three tents.  This is where the story goes full Old Testament.  We are on a mountain.  Moses and Elijah are there.  A bright cloud surrounds them, and God’s voice comes from it.  “This is my beloved Son, with who I am well pleased. Listen to Him.”  Now God the Father could have said, “This is Moses follow his laws” or he could have said, “this is Elijah, heed his prophesy.”  What He says instead is, “listen to my Son.”  The law and prophesy from the Old Testament revealing that Jesus is the author and fulfillment of both.  This revelation of who Jesus is transfigures the apostles.  Jesus has a mission for them.  They are not meant to stay on that mountain top in honor of Jesus.  They need to use this experience not only to prepare for what they are about to experience in Christ’s Passion and death but also to go out into the world to preach the Gospel.  They need to go out and help others transform themselves into the likeness of Christ.  We are all called to do the same.  We need to let others know we all have the opportunity and ability to be glorified in, through and with Our Lord and Savior, Jesus Christ. 

May Jesus live in your heart forever,
Deacon Chris

Spiritual Reflection 2/21/2021

I am afraid that many of you have never really met Jesus one on one as a friend and don’t know him and his love for you, the love that will change your whole life forever.”

Those are not my words. They are the words of Saint Mother Teresa. She said them to the sisters in her community who had already made a decision to leave everything behind. Saint Mother Teresa’s order, the Missionaries of Charity, live a radical life of poverty. They sleep on the floor. They have one dress that they wear. They don’t really own anything. They live to give themselves to people in all sorts of really difficult circumstances, and yet Mother Teresa said those words to her community. As we start this great season, Mother Teresa’s words come to mind. I am afraid that they are true for a lot of us in the Church today.

This past Wednesday we began the season of Lent, but I am afraid that it is so misunderstood by so many people. If we don’t get Lent right and we don’t get Easter right, then to be a Christian is to just follow a bunch of rules. What is Lent all about then? For myself, Lent for years was focused on me. What was I going to do? It became something like a self-help plan. We may have looked to Lent to see how good we can be in this season and what we could give up or what charity we could give to. But that is not what Lent is about. Lent is all about what God has done for us. It is a long preparation for the greatest week of the year: Holy Week. The greatest event to ever happen in the world happened on Good Friday, where He offered up his life, so that you and I can live.

Lent is a time for us to focus on Him and respond to Him by how we lovingly treat others. The readings on Ash Wednesday warn us not to make these 40 days external observances. They can easily become some sort of a check list for us, “Yep, did that and gave up this.” Lent is supposed to be a time of preparation for Holy Week and Easter, a time where we can say back to Saint Mother Teresa, “You are wrong, I have met Him and I do know Him. I know the cross did not happen for us, but He died for ME because that is Lent. This is the goal.” By the time we get to Good Friday and Easter Sunday, hopefully we can say I understand Jesus better and why He did what he did for me. Because I know him better now, I want to live my life for Him. I want to be different. I want to be great. I want to be heroic. I want to be Good. I want to be Holy. I want to give my life to others. I want all of these things because I have come to know Him as the greatest of friends.

This Lent think about why we are doing what we are doing in Fasting, Prayer and Almsgiving. Are we doing these things to check the box or are we doing these things to get to know Our Lord and Savior better? My prayer for you, and please pray for me, is that we fight to choose the latter, where we come to understand more His passion, death and resurrection, that we come to know His Awesome Love and respond to others in same way!

Week of February 21, 2021

Saturday February 20th
4:00 pm † Intentions of the Parishioners

Sunday February 21st
1st Sunday of Lent
9:00 am † For those affected by COVID-19
11:00 am † Intentions of the Presider

Monday February 22nd
Chair of St. Peter
6:30 am † Deceased members of the Dominican Family

Tuesday February 23rd
St. Polycarp
6:30 am † Kate Gormley

Wednesday February 24th
6:30 am Patricia DiLeva

Thursday February 25th
6:30 am Evelyn McDaniels

Friday February 26th
6:30 am † Helen McMahon

Saturday February 27th
4:00 pm † Intentions of the Parishioners


Remembering in our Prayers…
… all those who are sick … Mary Trauger, Loretta Boyle, Margaret DeLucas, James Dehan, Robert Farrell, Nina Ferraro, Teresa Riegal, Eric Bull, Bruce Seth, Tom Rufe, Vanessa Wismer and the residents of Garden Springs and the Landings.

… all those who are deceased … Senator Stewart J. Greenleaf, Sr. & Michael J. Weathers.

Eternal rest grant unto them, O Lord.

Spiritual Reflection 2/14/21

The Secret of a Loving Marriage and Family

Marriage and family life are a blessing and a gift from God. In the fulfillment of this Sacrament, the marriage of a Christian man and woman is a sign of the marriage between Christ and the Church. While marriage is a special blessing for Christians because of the grace of Christ, marriage is also a natural blessing and gift for everyone in all times and cultures. It is a source of blessing to the couple, to their families, and to society and includes the wondrous gift of co-creating human life. Marriage brings much happiness and many joys, but every couple eventually must deal with problems in the home, as there is no perfect marriage and family. Problems like finances, communication, and conflict resolution are all important to work through to cultivate strong, loving relationships. There is a secret to totally resolving these and other difficulties that even the best resources of marriage counselors cannot help you with.

Do you want to know the secret for building the type of marriage and family relationships you desire? The secret is this: If you want to experience marriage and family the way it was designed to be, you need a vital relationship with the God who created you and offers you the power to live a life of joy and purpose. Jesus Christ said: “I came that they might have life and have it abundantly.” And Psalm 16:11 tells us that in God’s presence is “fullness of joy.” God gives us a biblical plan for making family relationships work and then He gives us the power to follow that plan through a relationship with Him.

To establish a relationship with God, both spouses and their children must admit that they are sinners and seek His forgiveness and peace in the Sacrament of Reconciliation. They should also thank the Lord Jesus for dying on the cross to obtain forgiveness of sins and ask Him to make them the kind of persons He wishes them to be. Parents must assist their children in realizing God’s tremendous love for them and be dedicated to their Faith Formation and preparation for the Sacraments of Initiation and Healing. Until COVID-19 is under control, weekly, virtual Mass attendance accompanied by a fervent Spiritual Communion are acceptable. Post COVID-19, faithful attendance at Sunday Mass with the reception of the Body and Blood of Christ, along with occasional reception of the Sacrament of Penance must be faithfully observed, to deepen one’s relationship with the Lord.

Only when we give God total control of our lives and allow ourselves to be directed and empowered by the Holy Spirit, are we equipped to maintain a vital relationship with the Lord. Fervent prayer and frequent reception of the Sacraments will enable spouses and children to live by the Spirit. When all family members trust the Lord with every detail of their lives, the Holy Spirit will gradually increase the love, joy, peace, patience, kindness, faithfulness, gentleness, and self-control that dwells within each one. Embracing and living out the secret of establishing a vital relationship with our God by each member will truly revolutionize your marriage and family life. With God in charge, life becomes an amazing adventure!

May God love and bless you!
Sr. Kathleen Fitzpatrick, IHM

Week of February 14, 2021

Saturday February 13th
4:00 pm † Intentions of the Parishioners

Sunday February 14th
6th Sunday in Ordinary Time
9:00 am † For those affected by COVID-19
11:00 am † Intentions of the Presider

Monday February 15th
6:30 am † Mildred Ostrander

Tuesday February 16th
6:30 am Intentions of the Keough Family

Wednesday February 17th
Ash Wednesday
6:30 am † Joy Burns
7:00 pm † Lawrence O’Brien

Thursday February 18th
6:30 am † Eileen Delzingaro

Friday February 19th
6:30 am † Edna Dougherty

Saturday February 20th
8:00 am † Charles Manning


Remembering in our Prayers…
… all those who are sick … Mary Trauger, Loretta Boyle, Margaret DeLucas, James Dehan, Robert Farrell, Nina Ferraro, Teresa Riegal, Eric Bull, Bruce Seth, Tom Rufe and the residents of Garden Springs and the Landings.

… all those who are deceased … Sr. M. Judith Ann Moeller, IHM, Donald Rieco, John Suchanic, & Michael Spagna.

Eternal rest grant unto them, O Lord.

Spiritual Reflection 2/7/2021

+Dear Saint David Parishioners,

Hope in God. He is always with us. We at times in life may feel like Job in today’s first reading. Job is feeling devastated after the death of his wife and children and the loss of all his belongings. He complains to his friends who suggest that his misfortune is due to some sin he committed; this is what people in those days believed. Job not only turns to his friends, who are not much of a consolation, but also to God and begs for relief from all his suffering.

Even though Job pours out his sorrows to God, he never denounces Him as the devil suggested that he would. Job does not despise God but instead proclaims, “The Lord gives and the Lord has taken away; blessed be the name of the Lord” (Job 1:21)! Now that is certainly deep faith, trust, and love of God! Eventually Job is blessed for his perseverance and receives many blessings, such as, a new wife, more children, and plenty of material goods.

At this point in time, nearly a year dealing with the pandemic, we may be feeling hopeless due to financial hardships, sickness, loss of a loved one due to COVID, or loneliness in not being able to visit others outside our household, etc. Perhaps after some time of mourning losses and discussing these with family and friends, which is definitely helpful, we must also take our worries and surrender them to Jesus, our Savior.

Jesus is with us every step of the way and wants to accompany us in good times and in bad. Like Job, we need to place our trust in God and allow Him to show us the way. How are we to know the way? To hear Jesus, we need to quiet our minds and hearts and spend time with Him in prayer so that He can gently comfort, console, and lead us. Sometimes in prayer, if you are like me, our minds will not shut down.  The to-do list may come to mind or other thoughts and responsibilities may distract us, both of which are normal. Each time these distractions arise, simply take a second to acknowledge them, and then ask the Holy Spirit to help you to pray. Jesus understands our diversions of mind. We cannot forget that He too was human. Recall how He instructed His followers, “Your Father knows what you need before you ask Him. This is how you should pray” (Mt. 6: 8-9). Jesus then taught them and us the Our Father.

Therefore, in faith and trust we can proclaim in today’s responsorial psalm, “Praise the Lord, Who heals the brokenhearted.” If you are feeling heartbroken, then allow Jesus to approach you and help you up so that you may be of service to others as Peter’s mother-in-law did after Jesus healed her. Jesus does not want us to be despondent but wants us to spend time with Him in prayer and allow ourselves to be strengthened with His grace for our ultimate destination, heaven. Safe travels!

In Mary’s Immaculate Heart, I am,
Sister Mary

Week of February 7, 2021

Saturday February 6th
St. Paul Miki
4:00 pm† Intentions of the Parishioners

Sunday February 7th
5th Sunday in Ordinary Time
9:00 am† For those affected by COVID-19
11:00 am† Intentions of the Presider

Monday February 8th
St. Jerome Emiliani & St. Josephine Bakhita
6:30 am† Jose & Victoria Salvador

Tuesday February 9th
6:30 am† Richard M. Gusherowski

Wednesday February 10th
St. Scholastica
6:30 am† Mary Fitzpatrick

Thursday February 11th
Our Lady of Lourdes
6:30 am† Margaret Morrow 1st Anniversary

Friday February 12th
6:30 am† Stephen Groch

Saturday February 13th
8:00 am† Anne Needham


Remembering in our Prayers…
… all those who are sick … Mary Trauger, Loretta Boyle, Margaret DeLucas, James Dehan, Robert Farrell, Nina Ferraro, Teresa Riegal, Eric Bull, Bruce Seth, and the residents of Garden Springs and the Landings.

… all those who are deceased … Mary Ann Volpe

Eternal rest grant unto them, O Lord.